ConFronti. Speakeasy a cura di Arianna Parisoli, Giorgia Manfredi, Valentina Rossi, Marianna Sorbi e Gaia Bianchi

Prosegue la collaborazione fra il Liceo Linguistico “Cattaneo-Dall’Aglio” e Redacon.

"Speakeasy", una rubrica curata dagli studenti.

-----

ConFronti

Early 20th century gas masks. National Photo Company Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

The year 2018 was the hundredth anniversary of the end of World War I. We would like to remind everybody of the cruelty of war, which must never be repeated, and we would like to do that through the words not of historians or politicians, but of poets.

We also had the possibility to watch a theatre performance called ‘Quel canto di soldati- Alpi Orientali 15-18’ which permitted us to hear some Italian traditional war songs and to see some photos taken at the front. We have decided to write an article about this issue because, thanks to what we had studied at school and to the performance, we could face better as hard a subject as World War I and share our opinions about it with our readers.

When World War I broke out in 1914, there had been a high increase in patriotism, which enabled Britain to face that atrocious ordeal with impressive unity. This idea of patriotism fuelled the hopes and dreams of many young soldiers who joined the fighting. British soldiers were, in the beginning, mostly volunteers. They wanted to fight but they did not know what they were in for and what war was about. In addition to that, they thought that it wouldn’t last long.

In Italy the atmosphere was quite different: in fact Italy, at the beginning of the War,  was a very young country and the feeling of belonging to one homeland hadn’t been developed yet. As the fighting went on, a feeling of nationalism grew stronger among the population.

You’ll notice that both poems deal with the death of a companion and you’ll feel in first person the tragedy that comes from losing a friend.

Let’s read them!

 

Wilfred Owen

Dulce et decorum est – By Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,

Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,

Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,

And towards our distant rest began to trudge.

Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,

But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;

Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots

Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling

Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,

But someone still was yelling out and stumbling

And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—

Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,

As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,

He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace

Behind the wagon that we flung him in,

And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,

His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;

If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood

Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,

Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud

Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

To children ardent for some desperate glory,

The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est

Pro patria mori.

Owen’s words are full of anger towards society and the government  which sent and encouraged lots of young men to join the war without letting them know what it would be like. Therefore, he accused them of raising false hopes in boys who were looking for glory and of telling lies about what lent dignity to a human being. The title, a quotation from the Latin poet Horace, refers to the belief that dying for your own country was “sweet” and “honourable”, but the poet, at the end, calls it the old Lie.  
Owen’s companion dies of gas poisoning: his death is neither ‘sweet’ nor ‘honourable’.

Ungaretti, too,  is faced with the death of a comrade:

Veglia – By Giuseppe Ungaretti

Un’intera nottata

Buttato vicino

A un compagno

Massacrato

Con la sua bocca

Digrignata

Volta al plenilunio

Con la congestione

Delle sue mani

Penetrata

Nel mio silenzio

Ho scritto

Lettere piene d’amore

Non sono mai stato

Tanto

Attaccato alla vita

Ungaretti, unlike Owen, decided to address the poem to himself,  writing what looks more like the personal page of a diary. He is paying homage to a soldier who died without his family, so he is trying to re-establish a feeling of humanity. Ungaretti, in the end, says that being so in touch with death made him more and more attached to life. We think the sentence in which he wrote “ho scritto lettere piene d’amore” is a sort of removal from the  situation in which the poet found himself. Love or warm feelings were hard to find during the war, so this was a way to keep thinking positive.

Although both poems are stating that war is something bad, which, at the very end, only leads to pain, they are structured in a different way. Whereas Owen’s lines are really long and they respect a strict rhyming scheme, Ungaretti’s style is drier and hits the reader because of its simplicity.

Even though the differences between the two poems are evident, the reader can work out his own idea about war and is emotionally turned on by the hard and impressive images that are transmitted.

Gassed. John Singer Sargent, 1919

***

Early 20th century gas masks. National Photo Company Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

L’anno 2018 è stato il centenario della fine della prima guerra mondiale. Ci piacerebbe ricordare a tutti la crudeltà della guerra, che non dovrà mai ripetersi e ci piacerebbe fare ciò attraverso le parole non di storici o politici, bensì di poeti.

Inoltre, abbiamo avuto la possibilità di assistere a uno spettacolo teatrale chiamato “Quel canto di soldati-Alpi orientali 15-18”, che ci ha dato la possibilità di ascoltare canzoni tradizionali italiane riguardanti la guerra e di vedere alcune foto scattate nel fronte. Abbiamo deciso di scrivere un articolo riguardante questo soggetto perché, grazie allo spettacolo e a ciò che abbiamo studiato, possiamo affrontare meglio un tema così difficile come la prima guerra mondiale e condividere le nostre opinioni a riguardo con i lettori.

Quando nel 1914 scoppiò la prima Guerra mondiale, ci fu un’alta crescita del sentimento patriottico, il quale permise alla Gran Bretagna di affrontare questa terribile traversia con una impressiva unità.

Questa idea di patriottismo riempì di speranza e di sogni i giovani che decisero di arruolarsi e di combattere. I soldati inglesi erano, inizialmente, per la maggior parte volontari. Volevano combattere ma non sapevano esattamente di cosa si trattasse e che cosa una guerra poteva implicare. In aggiunta a ciò, pensavano che non sarebbe durata così a lungo.

In Italia l’atmosfera era abbastanza diversa: infatti l’Italia, all’inizio della guerra, era uno stato ancora “giovane” e il sentimento di appartenenza a una terra d’origine e a una patria non era ancora stato sviluppato.

Con il continuare dei combattimenti, un sentimento nazionalistico iniziò a crescere fra la popolazione.

Noterai che entrambe le poesie hanno a che fare con la morte di un soldato, e sentirai in prima persona la tragedia che deriva dalla perdita di un amico.

Leggiamole!

 

Wilfred Owen

Dulce et decorum est – by Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,

Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,

Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,

And towards our distant rest began to trudge.

Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,

But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;

Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots

Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling

Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,

But someone still was yelling out and stumbling

And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—

Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,

As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,

He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace

Behind the wagon that we flung him in,

And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,

His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;

If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood

Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,

Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud

Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

To children ardent for some desperate glory,

The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est

Pro patria mori.

 

Le parole di Owen sono piene di rabbia nei confronti della società e del governo che mandava e incoraggiava i giovani a prender parte alla guerra senza fargli sapere come sarebbe stato. Perciò egli li accusava di crescere false speranze nei ragazzi che erano in cerca di gloria e di qualcosa che li avrebbe resi degni di essere umani.

Il titolo, una citazione del poeta latino Orazio, si riferisce alla credenza che morire per la propria patria era “dolce” e “onorevole” ma alla fine il poeta la chiama “la vecchia Bugia”.

Il compagno di Owen morì a causa dell’avvelenamento del gas: la sua morte non fu né “dolce” né “onorevole”.

Anche Ungaretti ha a che fare con la morte di un amico:

 

Veglia – by Giuseppe Ungaretti

Giuseppe Ungaretti

Un’intera nottata

Buttato vicino

A un compagno

Massacrato

Con la sua bocca

Digrignata

Volta al plenilunio

Con la congestione

Delle sue mani

Penetrata

Nel mio silenzio

Ho scritto

Lettere piene d’amore

Non sono mai stato

Tanto

Attaccato alla vita

 

Diversamente da Owen, Ungaretti decide di dedicare la poesia a se stesso, come se stesse scrivendo una pagina di diario. Cercando di ristabilire un sentimento di umanità quasi completamente scomparso a causa, prova a rendere omaggio ad un soldato caduto lontano da casa e dagli affetti familiari. Alla fine della poesia, Ungaretti dice di non essersi mai sentito tanto attaccato alla vita come in quel momento e crediamo che nelle parole ‘ho scritto lettere piene d’amore’ stia provando a fuggire da quella che è la situazione tragica in cui si trova. Amore e serenità sono quanto di più lontano si possa sperare per gli uomini in trincea, e probabilmente fuggire, anche solo con l’immaginazione, può essere il modo per vedere il lato positivo delle cose.

Sebbene entrambe le poesie affermino che la guerra è qualcosa di brutto, la quale, alla fine, conduce solamente al dolore, sono strutturate in modo diverso.

Mentre i versi di Owen sono molto lunghi e rispettano un rigido schema ritmico, lo stile di Ungaretti è più pungente e colpisce il lettore grazie alla sua semplicità.

Anche se le differenze tra le due poesie sono evidenti, il lettore riesce ad elaborare la propria idea riguardo la guerra ed è emotivamente toccato dalle dure e impressionanti immagini che sono trasmesse.

(Arianna Parisoli, Giorgia Manfredi, Valentina Rossi, Marianna Sorbi e Gaia Bianchi)

 

Dulce et decorum est, di Wilfred Owen

Piegati in due, come vecchi straccioni, sacco in spalla,
le ginocchia ricurve, tossendo come megere, imprecavamo nel fango,
finché volgemmo le spalle all’ossessivo bagliore delle esplosioni
e verso il nostro lontano riposo cominciammo ad arrancare.
Gli uomini marciavano addormentati. Molti, persi gli stivali,
procedevano claudicanti, calzati di sangue. Tutti finirono azzoppati; tutti ciechi;
ubriachi di stanchezza; sordi persino al sibilo
di stanche granate che cadevano lontane indietro.
Gas! GAS! Svelti ragazzi! - Come in estasi annasparono,
infilandosi appena in tempo le goffe maschere antigas;
ma ci fu uno che continuava a gridare e a inciampare
dimenandosi come in mezzo alle fiamme o alla calce.-
Confusamente, attraverso l’oblò di vetro appannato e la densa luce verdastra,
come in un mare verde, lo vidi annegare.
In tutti i miei sogni, davanti ai miei occhi smarriti,
si tuffa verso di me, cola giù, soffoca, annega.
Se in qualche orribile sogno anche tu potessi metterti al passo
dietro il furgone in cui lo scaraventammo,
e guardare i bianchi occhi contorcersi sul suo volto,
il suo volto a penzoloni, come un demonio sazio di peccato;
se solo potessi sentire il sangue, ad ogni sobbalzo,
fuoriuscire gorgogliante dai polmoni guasti di bava,
osceni come il cancro, amari come il rigurgito
di disgustose, incurabili piaghe su lingue innocenti -
amico mio, non ripeteresti con tanto compiaciuto fervore
a fanciulli ansiosi di farsi raccontare gesta disperate,
la vecchia Menzogna: Dulce et decorum est 
Pro patria mori.

Le altre lezioni di inglese.

Agenzia Redacon ©
E' vietata la riproduzione totale o parziale e la distribuzione con qualsiasi mezzo delle notizie di REDACON, salvo espliciti e specifici accordi in materia e con citazione della fonte. Violazioni saranno perseguite ai sensi della legge sul diritto d’autore.

Lascia un Commento

Se sei registrato puoi accedere con il tuo utente e la tua password. Se vuoi registrarti al sito clicca qui.

Altrimenti lascia un commento utilizzando il form sottostante.

Powered by WordPress | Officina48